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CrashedAgain
12-24-2004, 04:36 AM
Knoppix autoconfig regenerated these each boot on a Knoppix style HD install. Is this necessary? I have edit knoppix-autoconfig so that it doesn't do this, seems to be working OK. (No emoticon for fingers crossed!)
Should I expect this to cause problems?

eco2geek
12-24-2004, 08:01 AM
Doesn't a "Knoppix-style install" regenerate everything when you restart it, just like Knoppix does when running off the CD with a persistent home? Including zapping any root/user passwords you may have set the last time around, regenerating /etc/fstab, and so on?

There was an in-depth doc about how "Knoppix-style," "Beginner-style," and "Debian-style" installs differed that seems to be unavailable since the Documentation section is still down. But a "Debian-style" install seems to be the way to go if you want your configuration to "stick" from session to session (although you can probably load your saved configuration into a "Knoppix-style" install by passing a "cheatcode" as a kernel parameter in your bootloader).

CrashedAgain
12-24-2004, 03:41 PM
In theory a Knoppix style regenerates everything but actually not, passwords stay, fstab is normally regenerated but you can override this by including the nofstab cheatcode in the lilo append= line. xf86config-4 only overwrites if an existing one is not found so it stays as is. However, since you are on HD the old configs are still there until they are overwritten by the startup script so it shouldn't be necessary to overwite everything, hdware setup is still the same, etc. so I have eliminated regenerating ld.so.cache & modules.dep to speed up startup.

A debian style install might have been a better choice but I did the Knoppix style because I wanted to make a remaster from it. You can make a remaster from an operating knoppix style system instead of fiddling about with chrooting into a special system, I wrote a how-to...

Now this system have been running for some time, it has been extensively customized, I don't want to reinstall, so I'm just tweaking a bit.
I usually tweak 'til it's broken, just wondering if it's going to break sooner or later.

scruffyeagle
01-14-2005, 05:15 AM
In theory a Knoppix style regenerates everything but actually not, passwords stay, fstab is normally regenerated but you can override this by including the nofstab cheatcode in the lilo append= line. xf86config-4 only overwrites if an existing one is not found so it stays as is. However, since you are on HD the old configs are still there until they are overwritten by the startup script so it shouldn't be necessary to overwite everything, hdware setup is still the same, etc. so I have eliminated regenerating ld.so.cache & modules.dep to speed up startup.

A debian style install might have been a better choice but I did the Knoppix style because I wanted to make a remaster from it. You can make a remaster from an operating knoppix style system instead of fiddling about with chrooting into a special system, I wrote a how-to...

Now this system have been running for some time, it has been extensively customized, I don't want to reinstall, so I'm just tweaking a bit.
I usually tweak 'til it's broken, just wondering if it's going to break sooner or later.

Hi!

I'm also working with a Knoppix style HD installation, but in my case it wasn't really an intentional choice (as vs. the other options). It's just that this is the first time it actually resulted in a working OS on HD; i.e., other, previous installation attempts using "Beginner" & "Debian-like" flopped. I definitely resemble that remark, re. tweaking till it breaks, except my such experiences in the past were with Windows systems (I'm still a bit of a newbie, in Linux). Reading your post here, I wondered:

1) What exactly did you do in knoppix-autoconfig, to disable the regeneration routine?
2) Have you seen any detrimental side effects yet?
3) After tweaking knoppix-autoconfig to disable the regeneration routine, was it still necessary to use the "nofstab" param during boot-up to avoid over-writing the fstab?