PDA

View Full Version : NTFS write support



kidsatacrux
04-10-2005, 10:00 AM
NTFS write support seems reliable enough with Captive http://www.jankratochvil.net/project/captive/

Only thing to do would be to build a custom LiveCD using this.

So which one has it?

arkaine23
04-10-2005, 11:19 AM
All Knoppix's from 3.4 - 3.7 and remasters based on them.

kidsatacrux
04-10-2005, 10:11 PM
If that's the case,

there's still some room for improvement because I have yet to boot any of those and had the ability to write on the NTFS.

audioaficionado
08-06-2005, 08:01 PM
I suppose I'll try that out when I get the DVD iso burned to a DVD.

I'll just create a small NTFS partition on a drive and then copy various file types to it while in XP.

Then in Knoppix I'll copy, append, modify and delete some files.

The acid test will be when I go back into XP and try the same thing. If Knoppix screwed anything up, XP will have serious problems with that partition.

I've never had problems reading and copying files from an NTFS partition to FAT32 or Linux FS.

Harry Kuhman
08-06-2005, 09:30 PM
Consider that there may be good reason why something as desirable as being able to write to NTFS has been removed from recent Knoppix versions.

audioaficionado
08-11-2005, 02:38 AM
Consider that there may be good reason why something as desirable as being able to write to NTFS has been removed from recent Knoppix versions.Legal issues most likely. NTFS is still 100% property of Microsoft. A similar issue prevented Klaus from including nF2 drivers in Knoppix awhile back IIRC. If you wanted them, you had to do a remaster to include them.

UnderScore
08-11-2005, 03:36 AM
Legal issues most likely. NTFS is still 100% property of Microsoft. A similar issue prevented Klaus from including nF2 drivers in Knoppix awhile back IIRC. If you wanted them, you had to do a remaster to include them.Then how do you explain MS Word DOC being able to be opened up in OpenOffice or a Linux server running Samba that makes it appear as if it were a Windows NT server to Windows clients. There is nothing illegal about doing a clean room reverse engineering job on the NTFS filesystem. History has proven it legal.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_PC_compatible

Columbia copied the IBM PC and produced the first 'compatible' (ie compatible to the IBM PC standard) PC in 1982. Compaq Computer Corp. produced its first IBM PC compatible (which was also the first sewing machine-sized portable PC) a few months later in 1982 the Compaq Portable. Compaq could not directly copy the BIOS as a result of the court decision in Apple v. Franklin, but it could reverse-engineer the IBM BIOS and then write its own BIOS using clean room design. Compaq became a very successful PC manufacturer, and was bought out by Hewlett-Packard in 2002.
In the case of Samba, how does freedom loving developers interoperate with closed & locked Windows networking protocols? The Samba dev team reverse engineered the protocols by observing how windows client & servers talk to each other at the packet level. Then through trial & error, they wrote their own implementation that would speak the language of SMB/CIFS, the Windows Networking protocols. I'm just mucking the words up, its better if you read PhD Andrew Tridgell's words about that. "Myths About Samba" - Andrew Tridgell http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20050205010415933 and "How Samba was written" - Andrew Tridgell, August 2003 http://samba.org/ftp/tridge/misc/french_cafe.txt


Writing a good NTFS driver from essentially nothing is just not an easy task & requires much work & many resources to be pooled together.

helpdeskdan
07-26-2007, 08:06 PM
Captive NTFS was removed because the author decided to stop maintaining it