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Thread: Windows user now... Linux user tommorow?

  1. #1

    Windows user now... Linux user tommorow?

    I am currently using Windows XP, I just got a new motherboard and whatnot... was waiting for longhorn(i have the 64 bit motherboard thing)
    im not too knowledgeable about computer stuff but I know more then a lot of people I know...
    so uh ya... ive never heard of anything other then Windows and Mac until this point in time...
    can someone explain to me... if I get Linux without even trying Knoppix and stuff... what are my chances of being disappointed
    will i still be able to play the games I play now?
    are there any hardware problems? where can I get info for this?(a list of some sort hopefully)
    I hear that security is better... that doesnt seem to be too much of a problem for me... I don't use IE and I have a software Firewall and Norton Antivirus...
    (atleast I don't think I have a security problem) but better security would be a good reason for me to switch to Linux.
    what is the difference between Redhat, and some other odd names... I thought it was just gonna be Linux... but it seems that there are many different types of it?

    so ultimately:
    if I switch to linux... will I get tons of headaches?

  2. #2
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    if I get Linux without even trying Knoppix and stuff... what are my chances of being disappointed.
    depends what you expect. if you expect something like win that does everything just like win you gt disapointed, if you expect something that wil work well but require work from you to get ti there you migt get a pleasant surprise.

    will i still be able to play the games I play now?
    if you pay for sedega you will be able to play a few of them. not all and not withpout tsome trouble.

    are there any hardware problems? where can I get info for this?(a list of some sort hopefully)
    yes there is, some hardware might not be suported (mostly modems and sound as far as i can see).
    here is a begining.
    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Hardware-HOWTO/
    I hear that security is better... that doesnt seem to be too much of a problem for me... I don't use IE and I have a software Firewall and Norton Antivirus...
    if used wisely yes better, if used badly somewhat better. clam antivirus is ok and fsecure, both work for linux. and firewall is built in to most linux distributions.

    Code:
    what is the difference between Redhat, and some other odd names...
    the diferences lay is mostly what programe, what version of said programe and how the distribution generally looks/feels.
    Certainly some minor diferences as to how things are done but, mainly no big diference when you creep below the eyecandy.

    and ofcource the easier distros like Fedora (Redhats free version, with no suport other than the forums) is easy but a bit bulky and cumbersome (in my eyes), they go for ease of use.
    Slackware and Debian are more for intermediate/expert users, more controll and more hands on aproach., but slightly more manualreading...
    basically i can boil it down to this.
    I would go with Fedora, Mandrake or suse for a first time try.
    if you want more of the config... to be in your hands i recomend Debian or Slackware.
    if you wantr to make it ALL!! LFS or Gentoo are the way to go. with those two you make it ALL from programcode up.

    linux, for me, is mostly freedom of choise and being able to make things YOUR way.
    if I switch to linux... will I get tons of headaches?
    how hard you want to make it is upo to you.
    but you wil find obstacles and pitfalls. hedache, possibly, but if you read carefully most of the path is fairly smooth.

  3. #3
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    Re: Windows user now... Linux user tommorow?

    Quote Originally Posted by zspecfenix17
    I am currently using Windows XP, I just got a new motherboard and whatnot... was waiting for longhorn(i have the 64 bit motherboard thing)
    im not too knowledgeable about computer stuff but I know more then a lot of people I know...
    so uh ya... ive never heard of anything other then Windows and Mac until this point in time...
    can someone explain to me... if I get Linux without even trying Knoppix and stuff... what are my chances of being disappointed
    will i still be able to play the games I play now?
    are there any hardware problems? where can I get info for this?(a list of some sort hopefully)
    I hear that security is better... that doesnt seem to be too much of a problem for me... I don't use IE and I have a software Firewall and Norton Antivirus...
    (atleast I don't think I have a security problem) but better security would be a good reason for me to switch to Linux.
    what is the difference between Redhat, and some other odd names... I thought it was just gonna be Linux... but it seems that there are many different types of it?
    First of all, OErjan has a lot of knowledge of the "other" Linux distrobutions, and though I cant give any input on any of the ones he mentions, I started out with Knoppix, and have recently moved to Kanotix, I would suggest trying both Knoppix and Kanotix, from the Live CD's...

    You can boot them, test your hardware detection, see what works, what needs to be "tweaked" to work, and what might "flat out" not work, with the Live CD boots, and all, without ever touching your Windows XP install... Just shutdown, remove the Live CD, and reboot back into your Windows XP. The "Live CD" gives you the ability to "see" what a Debian SID based OS of Linux, looks and feels, like, without having to "commit" to installing first.

    The other nice thing about booting the Live CD, is, that you can run the Linux OS, and learn a little, about doing things, getting around, etc... and still not have to "completely" deal with the OS, if you find that it just isnt what you want, or need, or work the way you want to work. If you decide that the Live CD Distro, is just what you want, and can work with, it can be installed, if you want.

    Linux is NOT as advanced as Windows is, in a few areas; Plug 'n' Play, and, some areas of hardware support. In Windows, considering that "everything" has been made to run in Windows, Linux "usually" takes a back seat in the manufacturers "support". Buying hardware for a "Linux" system, usually requires researching the hardware for support, location of drivers ( if the device is not "directly" supported ), and, sometimes, not buying the "newest and greatest" hardware that hits the "Hardware Aisle" at the Computer Store ( at least until "open source" support can be written for it, if it isnt already supported )

    Dont let that deter you from Linux though, its a great "alternative" to the "greed-fest" of the OS market-place, and, I have found that "I" can get by without ever running a Windows version, since back when I started my posting in these forums. There is not a day, that I learn something more, or something completely new, about Linux, or Knoppix, or Kanotix, or Debian, and I rather enjoy the "challenges" that Linux has given me. ( Windows was getting a little "mondane" and boring, not much new, other than keeping my "Security" patches up-to-date, and my constant downloading of Virus Signature files. )

    Quote Originally Posted by zspecfenix17
    so ultimately:
    if I switch to linux... will I get tons of headaches?
    Depends, are you "prone" to getting them with Windows? Remember, back when you "first" started running Windows, and had to search for drivers for some piece of hardware that wasnt detected correctly, just so that Windows wouldnt think it was a "Unknown Hardware Detected". Did you get headaches? If, you came up from the ranks of the Windows / DOS days, and having to run around finding out what the GUI "equivalent" was to a DOS command was, and dealing with the "poor" quality of "Help" that came with Windows. Did you get headaches? Did you ever install some program, that you wanted, only to find, that it stomped all over another program that you used, and now have to figure out how you can get "both" of them working at the same time? Did you get headaches? Well...

    I think you'll still get headaches then... Linux isnt perfect, and I, honestly, dont think its for everyone ( my oppinion ). Linux, in some cases, is the reverse of what "Windows" has become. When it comes to the example above, dealing with a GUI equivalent of a DOS command, Linux actually holds most of its power in the Command Line Interface, and the GUI is trying to catch up to that. So, in Linux, you will probably be searching for the command to run something that has a GUI, the reverse. As for the hardware issues... that can easily be resolved... buy hardware that will work in Linux. WinModems are a major problem in Linux, because they were created to "specifically" be used in "Windows", and the Windows OS has been made to "compensate" for the lack of "internal workings" that have not been supplied in a hardware's WinModem. Back in "the old days", modems had everything right on the hardware, usually, using a "standard" seriel port, and as long as you had a seriel port to plug it into, the modem worked. Now-a-days, modems are created that have "some" of the hardware on the modem, and Windows has the "rest" of the hardware for the modem, supplied in software, in its OS. Thus, the WinModem. Modem manufacturers loved this, they could make modems cheaper, and sell more of them. Windows loved them, cause they "tied" people to using there OS. As Linux started, it had, or still does have, to deal with a "partial" modem, and "come up" with the "software side" of what Windows was doing, all without having that information. ( read as "proprietary" )

    Some modems were "worked out", like the "LT" WinModems, or "Lucent Technologies". While, a lot of others, are still being worked on. I have found, that buying a "seriel" hardware modem, will work perfectly in either OS, and gets back to the "old days"... I have always just bought 56k fax / modems that use your seriel port, and they work excellent - no need for any drivers, or support -=- in fact, the modem I bought, actually HAD, on the side of the box, under the supported OS's, Linux, along with Windows support... Video cards are "somewhat" supported, within Linux, depending on your Linux Distrobution, but, researching manufacturers, brands, and models, will always be a "tried and true" test, in Linux. Sound, network, and audio, cards / hardware, should be done the same way... research...

    In the Windows World, you get "everything", you can buy anything, and, chances are, it is supported in Windows. Not exactly the same, in Linux Land. Research before you buy, because, it just might not be supported ( currently ) within Linux. Does that give you headaches? One last thing, do you get headaches learning something new, or having to learn something to get something done, or having to research to learn what you need to do - to get something done, or to do? Then, yes, you will want to buy a "bulk" of asperin, possibly, even buy stock of a manufacturer of asperin ( you pick your favorite )

    Hope this helps,
    Ms. Cuddles
    PS -=- I prefer Tylenol

  4. #4
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    i also started on Knoppix and found to be fairly easy to config and get used to ...it also helps to have good knowledge of the DOS command shell because a lot of the commands are the same and in linux u use the command shells quit often. another distro i would suggest would be ubuntu. its not as well equiped as knoppix but is a little easier to use for someone trying it out...both are live cd's

  5. #5
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    knoppix also has just that slight learning curve (which i love), which shows you a challange, but easily compleated which makes you feel good afterwards... hay... it sound the opposite of what windows makes me feel... (all offence about the win joke intendered)

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    I, also agree, with the two posters above - Knoppix is a good way to get into "Debian" - Knoppix can be learned from, and then translated into Kanotix, and then, you can easily, step-over, into a full-blown "Debian" install - if you want. Knoppix, and Kanotix, are both "based" off the Debian SID release. Whereas, Knoppix adds some customization that isnt in Debian, a lot more than what is in Kanotix. Whereas, Kanotix, is more "closely" related to Debian SID, but has its "roots" from Knoppix.

    You dont have to go to a "real" Debian release; Woody, Sarge, or SID - you can stick with Knoppix, or Kanotix - its all about what works for you, what you like, what you want, what you need, etc... The same holds true for "Window Managers"; you can choose between ICE, Gnome, KDE, etc... the list goes on... its all about what you like, and the way you want it...

    As for the "windows pun intended", I can honestly say, Windows DID pick the best "logo" for its OS's, the Flying Windows, cause with all the problems windows OS's have been having, I would suggest they alter there logo, just slightly, and make it a "broken windows" Flying logo, instead... ( or, possibly, a "dirty" window logo, at least. )

    Oh well, hope this helps,
    Ms. Cuddles

  7. #7
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    People, I have installed Knopix 3.7 on a hard drive, found a driver for a winmodem: ltmodem-8.31a10.tar.gz. Unpacked it and executed build_module. At the beginning everything is OK. It runs, it checks for system parameters, it starts compiling lt_modem.o. But then:

    Using KCFLAGS for gcc version 2.x
    gcc -D__KERNEL__ -I/lib/modules/2.4.27/build/include -Wall -Wstrict-prototypes -O3 -fomit-frame-pointer -fno-strict-aliasing -pipe -fno-strength-reduce -m486 -malign-loops=2 -malign-jumps=2 -malign-functions=2 -DCPU=586 -DMODULE -DLT_VERSION=8.31a10 -DLINUX -DNO_EEPROM -DLT_SERIAL_MODULE=lt_serial -DFORCEMODVERSIONS -DASMLINKAGE=asmlinkage -c -o ltmodem.a ltmodem.c

    Checking for driver products:

    Compilation of lt_modem.o failed,
    Do assess whether your utilities are up to date as listed within 1ST-READ!
    Read Compile_properly.txt from DOCs/.


    What may be the problem?

  8. #8
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    By the way, how can I assess whether are my utilities up to date as mentioned in 1ST-READ, or not?

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