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Thread: Wireless not working on Knoppix 6.7.1

  1. #1
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    Wireless not working on Knoppix 6.7.1

    Hello,

    That's in contrast to Knoppix 6.2.1 where Wireless works OK.

    I just got delivery of Knoppix 6.7.1 DVD.
    Hardware used:
    Dell Alienware M17x laptop with
    Wireless 1529 802.11n Half MiniCard

    Knoppix 6.2.1 (kernel 2.6.32.6, udev-150) detects the wireless module,
    loads the "wl" driver as device "eth1":
    iwconfig -> eth1

    Knoppix 6.7.1 (kernel 3.0.4, udev-172) loads the "wl" driver on boot but
    iwconfig -> nothing (i.e., no wireless device detected)

    In graphics mode (LXDE, for example) the applet "Wired network connection"
    (bottom right icon), does not offer any wireless Access Points lists.
    In the only other choice to "Wired Network", "VPN connections / Configure VPN",
    it's impossible to add your wireless capability with this applet.
    Whether in the "Wireless" tab or "VPN", even if you fill in the "questionnaires"
    with your data, the "Save" button never gets activated.
    Bottom line, you can NOT connect to your Access Point or any other.

    By contrast, on the old Knoppix 6.2.1, the wireless AP's in the neighborhood
    (including mine) are listed immediately, and then establishing the connection
    presents no problems.
    But then, here, on (auto) loading the "wl" driver, an "eth1" wireless device
    is created, so you have a fighting chance to connect later on.

    NOTE
    In troubleshooting, I've tried to understand the mechanism used by Knoppix to
    detect and create wireless devices.
    Normally, one uses Udev rules (in /lib/udev/ or /etc/udev/, etc.) but you
    couldn't find anything similar in Knoppix (for eth1 or wlan).
    For example, a test wireless device, Linksys USB 802.11b, _is_ detected by
    both Knoppix's as Atmel driver module "at76c50x_usb" and a corresponding
    device "wlan0" does appear from somewhere (IMHO, the name "wlan0" is more
    appropriate than "eth1", anyway).

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    My broadcom 802.11 a/b/g uses wl & connects to eth1 ok.
    You might try g instead of n if you can.
    Last edited by utu; 12-24-2011 at 03:53 PM.

  3. #3
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    Also, FWIW, I notice this offering from Broadcom
    with a relatively recent date on it.

    http://www.broadcom.com/support/802.11/linux_sta.php

  4. #4
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    Thank you for your comments but it seems you've missed the main point of the problem (and OP).
    The "old" disk (Knoppix 6.2.1) sees the wireless card (be it a,b,g,n,x,y,z) and works with it seamlessly.
    The "new", latest disk (Knoppix 6.7.1) does not recognize the card, and concequently the wireless does not work.
    It's as simple as that. Let's not complicate it.
    Thanks again.

  5. #5
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    I note that I have 5.100.82.38-2 installed and it works ok for me, but that
    5.100.82.112-4 is an available update for broadcom-STA-common on Synaptic.
    You might also try that if you haven't already.

  6. #6
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    Hi utu,
    Thank you for your comments.
    The main, and simple idea in my OP has been missed.
    On the _same_ hardware (laptop - as described in the OP) the "old" 6.2.1 disk handles the wireless OK and seamlessly.
    The new (latest) 6.7.1 disk cannot handle wireless at all (as described in more detail in OP).
    It's as simple as that. Let's not make it any more complcated as this simple comparison, Good vs. Bad.
    The point is for somebody to resolve this contradiction or to officialy declare the 6.7.1. disk faulty and fix it.
    Thanks again.

  7. #7
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    @ Alphonsu

    I think there are a number of possibilities that something
    may be different in your 6.7.1 and 6.2.1 set-ups, such as:
    1. You might have a flawed 6.7.1 DVD;
    2. You may have disabled your wifi;
    3. You name it for some critical difference; and
    4. You may indeed have discovered a 'special' case.

    In my experience, 1 or 2 usually explain the situation.
    I'm not aware of any such case 4 for 'wl' in Knoppix 6,
    but I can't speak to the 'n' case.

    Good luck on filing a bug report.

  8. #8
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    Hi Utu,

    Let's eliminate case no 1., where by "flawed" I assume you
    imply a _physical_ problem of some sort (manufacture, shipping, etc.)

    I start with the machine down, the wireless router up and running OK.

    A. I insert the 6.2.1. disk.

    B. I boot the machine all the way.
    I connect wireless without any problems.

    C. I shut down the machine.

    D. I remove the 6.2.1 disc from the machine.

    E. I insert the 6.7.1 disk.

    F. I boot the machine all the way.
    I can NOT connect wireless no matter what I do.

    G. I shut down the machine.

    H. I remove the 6.7.1 disc from the machine

    I. I go back to step A.

    I repeat the above loop 20 times.

    I stop to write my OP where I describe the possible _technical_ differences
    between the two discs the best I can. In the process I'm hoping to convey the notion
    that I have some idea about the Linux system workings, and technical acumen in general.

    I then, repeat the loop (starting at A) until I'm blue in the face.

    Then I pause and try to pass along the idea that 6.7.1. is not bad physically
    but bad technically, which would make it possibility no 5 on your list.
    Please note that in running the 6.7.1. for some other functions,
    I haven't discovered any "flaw" that might make the disc suspect physically.
    Other than the simple (but critical for me) wireless failure the disc appears
    functional.

    Your case no 2, is not applicable (as described in the "A" loop above).
    I do not understand your case no 3 (name?), not that it matters much by now.

    As for your case no 4, there's nothing "special" here and if there's any
    "discovery", it's just that for an identical configuration the 6.7.1 disc
    does not work at all (instead of just working like the 6.2.1 one,
    without any "special" considerations). For 6.2.1., the configuration
    I've been using is (and appears to be detected by 6.2.1. as) just
    run-of-the-mill, nothing special about it.

    Thank you for your interest and comments.

    BTW, I don't know how/where to file a bug report.
    Maybe you can help. Basically the 6.7.1. is worthless for me.
    The point is for somebody to identify the technical problem and fix it.

  9. #9
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    @Alphonsu

    It could be helpful to know the PCI-ID of your wireless card. The command
    Code:
    lspci -vnn
    should give you the PCI-IDs of all installed PCI devices.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alphonsu View Post

    I start with the machine down, the wireless router up and running OK.

    A. I insert the 6.2.1. disk.

    B. I boot the machine all the way.
    I connect wireless without any problems.

    C. I shut down the machine.

    D. I remove the 6.2.1 disc from the machine.

    E. I insert the 6.7.1 disk.

    F. I boot the machine all the way.
    I can NOT connect wireless no matter what I do.

    G. I shut down the machine.

    H. I remove the 6.7.1 disc from the machine

    I. I go back to step A.

    I repeat the above loop 20 times.
    .
    My first test is always to look for thumbprints.
    A greasy thumbprint is enough to cause a DVD to 'be flawed'.

    You can usually see thumbprints on the shiny side of a DVD
    if you hold the DVD up to the light at the right angle.
    Clean this with isopropyl alcohol & kleenex.

    If this doesn't clear things up, then maybe the DVD is flawed
    in manufacture. If the DVD is flawed in manufacture it will
    not pass MD5 tests, and the supplier should replace it.

    Most folks I'm sure do the md5 test first. I'm lazy; almost
    all my flawed DVDs turn out to be thumbprint problems, so I
    check that first.

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